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Overview

Factsheet About the National Quantum Initiative

Quantum-based technologies have already transformed society and the American economy. Examples include the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for medical imaging, semiconductors for computer chips, and lasers for telecommunications. Quantum information science (QIS) holds promise for another revolution in technology, with new, more powerful approaches to computing, networking, and sensing. The National Quantum Initiative (NQI) is a whole-of-government approach to ensuring the continued leadership of the U.S. in QIS and its technology applications.

About the logo <quantum|gov>

In quantum physics, the notation to represent a quantum system, such as the state of a quantum computer, is the so-called “ket” notation. For example, the ket |QC> would represent the state of a quantum computer. Following this terminology, <quantum|gov> then represents the overlap of |quantum> and |government>, which is what the national effort is all about.

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QIS – Quantum Information Science

 

Quantum Information Science (QIS) emerges from a deeper consideration of how quantum physics (our description of the world at the microscopic level) has implications for information science (how real systems like computers process information). Quantum information technology takes advantage of these fundamentally quantum properties of matter to design new types of computers, sensors, and networks which enable new speed, precision, or functionality. Building on key QIS scientific discoveries since the 1980s, pioneering experiments starting in the 1990’s, quantum engineering from the 2000s, and commercial activity today, the world is on the cusp of a second quantum revolution. The prospects for innovation fueled by QIS, with implications for our economic prosperity and national security, motivate an all-of-government and all-of-nation approach to coordinating QIS activities in the United States.

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NQIA – The National Quantum Initiative Act

 

 

The National Quantum Initiative Act (NQI Act) was signed into law by President Trump on December 21, 2018 “to accelerate quantum research and development for the economic and national security of the United States.” The NQI Act authorizes the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Energy (DOE), to strengthen QIS Programs, Centers, and Consortia. The NQI Act also calls for a coordinated approach to QIS Research and Development (R&D) efforts across the United States Government, including the civilian, defense, and intelligence sectors. To guide these actions, the NQI Act legislates some responsibilities for the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science (SCQIS), the NSTC Subcommittee on the Economic and Security Implications of Quantum Science (ESIX), the National Quantum Coordination Office (NQCO), and the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee (NQIAC). Recognizing that QIS technologies have commercial and defense applications, additional authorization for QIS R&D is legislated by the National Defense Authorization Act. Civilian, defense, and intelligence agencies all have a long history of investments in QIS, and have a stake in future QIS discoveries and technology development. The National Quantum Initiative now provides an overarching framework to strengthen and coordinate QIS R&D activities across U.S. Departments and Agencies, private sector industry, and the academic community.

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NDAA and Defense Legislation for QIS

 

The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 and the NDAA for FY 2020 legislate the Department of Defense (DOD) to carry out and support quantum information science and technology research and development. The NDAA authorizes the DOD to increase the technology readiness level of quantum information science technologies under development in the United States, support the development of a quantum information science and technology workforce, and enhance awareness of quantum information science and technology. The NDAA provides authorization to coordinate all quantum information science and technology research and development within the DOD, including through consultation with the NQCO, the SCQIS, and other appropriate Federal entities and private sector entities. The NDAA for FY 2020 further authorizes the establishment of Quantum Information Science Research Centers. The NDAA for FY 2022 amended the National Quantum Initiative Act to include the NSTC Subcommittee on the Economic and Security Implications of Quantum Science (ESIX).

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NQCO – The National Quantum Coordination Office

 

Located in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the National Quantum Coordination Office (NQCO) is legislated by the NQI Act to carry out the daily activities needed for coordinating and supporting the NQI. The Coordination Office is tasked with providing technical and administrative support to the SCQIS, ESIX and the NQIAC as well as overseeing the interagency coordination of the NQI Program. The NQCO serves as the primary point of contact on Federal civilian quantum information science and technology activities and conducts public outreach, including the dissemination of findings and recommendations of the SCIQS and the Advisory Committee, as appropriate. The NQCO staff are federal employees on detail assignments from across the government. To learn more about the NQCO and its staff click here.

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SCQIS – Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science

 

The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Subcommittee on Quantum Information Science (SCQIS) coordinates Federal research and development (R&D) in quantum information science and related technologies under the auspices of the NSTC Committee on Science. The aim of this R&D coordination is to maintain and expand U.S. leadership in quantum information science and its applications over the next decade. The SCQIS is co-chaired by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

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ESIX – Subcommittee on the Economic and Security Implications of Quantum Science

 

 

The National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Subcommittee on the Economic and Security Implications of Quantum Science (ESIX) was established to ensure that economic and security implications of QIS are understood across the agencies (see NDAA FY 2022: P.L. 117-81; Sec. 6606). The subcommittee provides a national security perspective to QIS related research. The ESIX Subcommittee coordinates with NSTC subcommittees, such as the SCQIS, to ensure that the economic and national security implications of basic research and development in QIS, along with derived technologies are fully understood. The subcommittee is co-chaired by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Security Agency (NSA).

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NQIAC – The National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee

 

 

The National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee (NQIAC) is the Federal Advisory Committee called for in the NQI Act. The NQIAC is tasked to provide an independent assessment of the NQI Program and to make recommendations for the President, Congress, and the NSTC Subcommittee on QIS to consider when reviewing and revising the NQI Program. The NQIAC consists of leaders in the field from industry, academia, and the Federal laboratories.

The NQIAC was first established by Executive Order 13885 on August 30, 2019, and information about its membership and activities can be found here. The NQIAC was enhanced by Executive Order 14073 on May 4, 2022, and more information about the advisory committee will be posted to quantum.gov.